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Pining for the Materiality of Code

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Publication Type:

Conference/Workshop Paper

Venue:

From Materials to Materiality: Connecting Practice and Theory in HCI, Workshop at the 2012 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) conference

Publisher:

ACM


Abstract

The new ubiquitous assistive devices have increased design space for innovative highly interactive design. Designers can no longer rely on a design process based on the known interaction idioms. This impedes the design process because the non-interactive material - sketches, scenarios, storyboards - does not provide designers the essential talk-backs needed to be able to make reliable assessments of the design characteristics. However, the interactive prototypes provide these talk-backs. How can we think of code as a design material? And how can the designer's repertoire expanded to include materials familiarity even to code?

Bibtex

@inproceedings{Lindell2450,
author = {Rikard Lindell},
title = {Pining for the Materiality of Code},
month = {May},
year = {2012},
booktitle = {From Materials to Materiality: Connecting Practice and Theory in HCI, Workshop at the 2012 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) conference},
publisher = {ACM},
url = {http://www.es.mdh.se/publications/2450-}
}